Dear Prospective Employer,


As I go through the process of looking for and applying to jobs, I feel the need to compose this letter to you. I’m writing to you because I don’t think two pdf documents and all my grade cards and certificates are enough reasons to consider me for a position let alone know me. I’m also writing to you because I want you to know how much effort goes into an application and how hard it is for all of us. Finding a job is hard in itself. Add to that the fact that you have to apply in a foreign language, know exactly what you want to do but can’t find an opening in it and you have a recipe for frustration.

I’m going through this process as a fresher while simultaneously working on my master thesis. This is how it is for most of us. We are more than aware of how important both our thesis and job applications are, but most of us can’t afford the luxury of applying once we are done with our studies. We have to because we can’t continue to rely on our families for financial assistance, because for a few of us we are the ones who support our families, because we have a huge loan in the bank whose interest is just waiting to drown us. For most of us it is at least one of these reasons and for some of us it’s all these reasons. Now while these are pressing reasons, we also can’t wait. We can’t wait to start working. We’re excited to see what we have to offer, we’re a little naive that way. And to be honest, you are better off hiring us at this time, bursting with enthusiasm and excited about our careers rather than when we have waited and faced rejection and are applying to anything and everything because we’re so desperately in need of a job.

Source: http://playgrounddad.nextimpulsemedia.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/76806713.jpg

I am sure I will be one of the hundreds or thousands of resumes stacked on your desk. On some days I may be the best of the lot, and the worst on some, but for the most part I will figure somewhere in the middle. I know this because most of us have the same grades, have done the same number of internships/student jobs and won the same number of awards. Competition, today, has grown so much that it’s hard to find people who have a below average grade or who have absolutely no practical experience. So I can only imagine how hard that makes it for you. At first glance we all seem the same to you and yet, we’re not.

Our grades, internships, awards, they don’t define us. These are things meant for us to do. What matters is the effort we put into our grades, the factors that led us to decide on an internship. It’s these behind the scenes decisions and work that define us as professionals and as individuals. Yet, these are inappropriate in a résumé and the space in the cover/motivation letter just isn’t enough to do justice to it all. We could try, but we’re not great writers. I guess that’s why we chose engineering as a profession.

For me, a glance at my grade card wouldn’t necessarily tell you what I like or find interesting, and while I would love to say I cherry picked my student jobs, projects and internships, you know I would be lying through my teeth. Some of them happened out of circumstance and some out of luck. That’s not to say that there was no effort though. They took a lot of effort and I’m really happy I did them because I learnt so much. I’m not saying it because it’s expected of me but because I really did. I tried to make the most of every situation. I dabbled in many things and while you would dismiss me calling me fickle, I would like to clarify that I was curious. After all, I was only a bachelor or master student still finding my footing. To say the least, I was curious. I was looking for that elusive love for work. What I’ve seen in my mother when she talks about her job even though she’s been doing that for 30 odd years. Thanks to all my fickleness, I have finally found it.

I’ve always liked cars and I thought knowing what I liked was enough. Apparently not. Why, I was asked. Frankly, I still don’t have an answer. I’ve loved cars for years just like I love chocolate. I’d like to see you try to tell me why you like your favourite colour or your favourite shirt. Sometimes there is no answer. I could bore you with conventional lies like I used to open up radios and toasters to see how they worked, so I knew I’d be an engineer but I didn’t, I would have gotten a nice spanking if I had tried. The best I can offer is that it was love at first sight. I know it may seem a frivolous reason to choose a profession, but what is the ‘correct’ reason?

I come from a country where education, especially higher education, is a luxury few can afford. Even in the case of those who can afford, only a few professions are considered lucrative and hence feasible to study. Throughout my academic career, I’ve met more people who were, disinterested at best and hated at worst, what they were studying. Is the fact that the profession earns you money the correct reason to choose it? It is a reason none the less. Most résumé on that list are there because of the above reason. Me, I’m not immune to it either but I’m in it because I love it. Passion and curiosity are my reason and that, I believe is my selling point.

Being a girl in the mechanical field can be hard. Not from the technical point of view. Thermodynamics and heat and mass transfer will seem like a cake walk compared to the bigotry you face in this field. It’s a male dominated world and they don’t like trespassers. Most people, even outside India, eye you with suspicion and distaste when you say you are studying mechanical engineering. I’ve had people in very high positions ask me ‘By choice or by chance’. It’s something my male counterparts have rarely faced. It’s very insulting. My gender is not my limitation. I’m here, always, by choice. It’s my passion that keeps me ticking.

I could tell you a lot about the subjects I’ve studied and the projects I’ve worked on but I’ll leave that to my résumé because I don’t think that is the reason you should recruit me. In my short experience I’ve realised that grades are just numbers and certificates are just pieces of paper that have no value once you step into the office. Whether at the top or bottom of the class, at work, we all start from zero. There have been days where I’ve not understood something, my grades didn’t help me then, my curiosity and stubbornness did. There have been days when my models or codes have not worked, my projects didn’t help me then, my perseverance and creativity did. On days that I didn’t get the results that I needed and my boss was not too pleased, my certificates didn’t come to my rescue, my fortitude did. I’ve worked with people from different countries and backgrounds, the seminars only gave me a background but my outgoing and social nature helped me get started.

I was not the smartest kid in my class and I may not be the best résumé on your desk but I hope you will give me a little more than the customary one or two minutes before tossing me away. I know this is asking a lot, but while to you it is just a résumé, to me, it’s a gateway to my future. My résumé can’t tell you that I’m sincere in my work, that I’m a loyal friend, that I’m stubborn (in a good way, I promise), I’m curious, friendly and punctual. It won’t tell you how I discovered my love for chassis and suspension or why I want to work in the research and development department. It won’t tell you how much I love cars and how I think they are pieces of art that most people can own unlike ‘actual art’ which only the rich can. It won’t tell you how much I respect and admire the amount of work that goes into making each and every one of them. It won’t tell you how I still squeal like an awed two-year old every time I see a car I love (I’ve been in Germany for 3 years now and I still can’t look the other way when I see a car I like). It can’t tell you that thanks to my curiosity I read about many different things and hence, make for pretty good lunch company. It can’t tell you that I believe excitement and passion are big motivators in a job, and that is why I am writing this to you. I want to be a part of the future of the auto industry and I can’t wait for the day I am. I hope you will be the one to give me my big break.

Yours sincerely,

Manasa Manjunath

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Manasa Manjunath

Automotive engineering master student from India who has a LITTLE TOO MANY interests in life. I'm not the most knowledgeable person out there but I do have an opinion about things. They need not be right but at least I'm my own person. My areas of interest range from fashion to food and literature to automobiles. I enjoy reading as much I enjoy trekking, traveling and working with cars. I love music but can't sing to save my life. I enjoy theater and have a keen interest in architecture, art, history and how they all come together. Always interested in trying new things and meeting new people. Most important part of my person you ask? Potterhead, Bangalorean and proud!

111 thoughts on “Dear Prospective Employer,”

    1. I have often thought the same thoughts, although I am not an engineer but a creative I have found the same thing. Two PDF to try to convince someone that I am the artist they want to hire to illustrate for them. That is insane I have thought, and the questions don’t pertain to why I would really be the best for the job.

      That said, I would suggest doing some serious research into situational interview questions and how to answer them. You are entering into a male dominated field and even if you weren’t you would still need to learn how to answer these types of questions in an interview. They are going to want to know how you have handled difficult people, difficult engineering problems, difficult supervisors, and so on and so forth. If you can nail these and I would practice answering them on a video cam, so you are a pro, then when you get those calls to interview you will be the most prepared of anyone there. I would research every possible situational and other interview question and have an answer prepared and down to a tee. You will want to be able to recite it like you are just talking to a great friend and they asked you a simple question.

      Also my last job required that I do 3 interviews and the first one was a video interview, so be prepared and practice up for that possibility also!

      Well hope this helps,
      Namaste
      Sj
      Chicken Little Go Home You’re Drunk! http://wp.me/p51RQQ-6 My new blog that I started about loving myself!

      Like

      1. Thanks for the tip. I’ve been so caught up with writing my thesis report and applyng that I haven’t had the time to think about the interviews. I’ll definitely work on it though! Thanks again 🙂

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    1. No. I haven’t. I was supposed to be making my cover letter but I was finding it very difficult to put in everything I wanted to say, plus the foreign language factor limits the number of ways I can express myself, and I ended up penning this. I do put a link to my blog in my CV so if they decide to have a look at the blog then it’s highly likely that they’ll find this. But now that you brought it up, I’m rather curious about what would happen too 🙂

      Liked by 6 people

    1. Thanks 🙂 That’s an interesting suggestion but I also think it would be too much for them. Instead of just 10 shortlisted candidates, they’d have to interview all the 100 who apply.

      I guess we need to evolve a different method of assessing applicants which also doesn’t stress out the recruiters.

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  1. that’s well written, very much relatable, even i’m a girl who is extremely fond of cars and have chosen the same pathway as you , I was overwhelmed to see that you are from the same country as me 🙂 so about the male dominance you have mentioned in your post, well, that’s so very true, my mother land up on that topic every single day, every time i mention the fact that there are just 14 girls in a class of 57. Something that i liked the most about your post was the way you have mentioned : ” Throughout my academic career, I’ve met more people who were, disinterested at best and hated at worst, what they were studying. Is the fact that the profession earns you money the correct reason to choose it? ” -so very true …… as for your job , good luck with it! Hope your prospective employers read this 🙂

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    1. Thank you! I’m so glad you could relate. I was 1 of 2 girls in a class with around 60 boys. The tragedy isn’t that we were just 2, the tragedy is that this was a relatively high number. The demographic isn’t much better abroad either. There is this myth that mechanical engineering is for boys which most people believe. Don’t let that get you down though. I’m sure you’ll do great so keep at it 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Right on the money with what it feels like to be a jobhunter, a very well-written piece indeed. I’ve been looking for a way out of retail into something I am passionate about for seven years now, and while I’ve still not escaped yet I have found blog-writing has worked wonders for my self-confidence (as did being freshly pressed shortly after I started!) I hope it has a similar effect on you! All the best for your future.

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    1. Thank you very much. I think it’s all the encouragement that comes from being on freshly pressed that builds your confidence. It’s really quite overwhelming at the moment. I hope you can follow your passion soon. Good luck!!

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  3. This is a beautifully written article. I really enjoyed reading it, mainly because I could relate to it. I am a Manager at a blue chip retailer & have recruited 100’s of people in my career. Furthermore, I have read more resumes (or CVs) than I can count.
    The truth is, it’s an extremely difficult job to properly sift through every CV that you receive, let alone give it the quality time & reading that it deserves.
    One thing I believe in doing, is at the very least, acknowledging each CV we receive, by email (it’s incredibly rare not to find an email address on a CV these days). This at least allows the candidate to know that you have it & are in the process of reading it.
    Finding jobs is very difficult these days, yet some people think that a few lines of their career history and a badly written cover letter is enough to entice an employer. If you have a poor CV & it happens to be sitting next to a better written and presented CV, it’s not difficult to guess what happens next
    I believe there’s an entire market out there, just in assisting people to help represent themselves in a more positive manner, that has hardly been scratched.
    Well done on being freshly pressed & best of luck with your job hunt.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. I can only imagine how hard it must be for you to go through all those applications. The sheer volume of it all seems overwhelming to me. I’ve been to a lot of career fairs and met HR reps from different companies where I’ve tried asking them questions on how I can stand out with my application. Most of the time they say just put everything you’ve done on your CV and make your cover letter interesting. My problem is that 2 pages is just not enough to cover everything so what do you leave out? Also what do you mean by interesting? I do believe that industry has a lot of untapped potential. Thanks again for the wishes 🙂

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  4. Great post. I have a slightly different approach to getting hired and have given up “looking for openings”. Openings have too much competition and having been in a position to hire, you get tired after the first 3 interviews. Resumes get buried and they all start to look the same after you read a couple. Hiring is not a fun activity(for me) but it’s central to a productive team. I got my last 2 careers by applying places I wanted to work and showing them why I’m indispensable.
    As a side note to that, I have left the “job” world and own an automotive restoration business in Wisconsin. I too am a woman that loves cars and found my way into the industry. It must run in my family as my sister is a GM Mechanic in Indiana. There are not nearly enough women contributing(other than their photos as pinups) to this industry. Young women are especially rare. I recently wrote a blog about the generation gap in the automotive field(not enough young people interested in cars…according to the older generations). It can be found here:
    http://blog.drivenrestorations.com/2014/08/addressing-generation-gap-in-classic.html
    The gender gap is a whole other can of worms. While I skirt the issue, it is only because I have yet to be able to put it into words without being a little too “ranty”. I enjoyed your account of your experiences both in the automotive industry and as a job applicant. I hope to be able to hear more from you in the future. Thank you for the post.

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    1. In Germany they have these initiative applications which you can make when you don’t find anything that interests you and that is what I’m doing right now. It’s what I did when I was looking for internship and it’s also how I bagged my current internship and master thesis.
      I agreee with you that there are not enough women in this industry but I also think that’s because of the how the whole industry is portrayed. Most people think we sit on the showfloor and come home covered in grease. How I wish that were true! They don’t know that most automotive jobs involves work in front of a computer just like any other job.
      Congratulations on starting your own business. It sounds great!
      Thanks for all the support and encouragement.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. “Whether at the top or bottom of class, at work we all start at zero.” Beautiful and true words.

    Also currently looking for work, but to no avail as yet. As for English not being your native tongue, if you have native friends you can ask them for help with the letter, so you’d write what you’d like to say, and they’d tweak it.

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    1. Thanks. English is more or less my native tongue but I’m currently pursuing my Masters in Germany and I have to apply in German which is not my native tongue. The problem is expressing myself in German in the first place. In English I can think of many different ways of saying something and it’s also that comes so freely and naturally to me. With German I have to actively think and search for the words. Thanks for the suggestion though. 🙂

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  6. I could’t agree more… The significance of a mere paper imprinted with academic and professional resumes is most often grossly taken too serious.. Many tend to consider such records (especially academic) as a major determinant of what one is and perhaps might not be capable of.. which ofcourse proves absurd many of the time.. I, myself just graduated high school about a couple or less months ago with quite attractive results.. My parents are currently working hard to get me a scholarship inorder to study abroad (I’m a native Gambian by the way; location: West Africa)… But in my case however; I’m aspiring to become a filmmaker which most of the time doesnt allude to academic records for judgement.. so thats good news for me in a particular regard… But who cares?.. Anyways I completely agree with the content of this thesis.. And lemme know if there is any petition to sign for the application of such notions in the labour market.. Its about time people learn to be good judge of characters without giving much regard what the white sheet of paper says.
    And you seem to be a smart lady worth attention. Wish you all the best of luck.

    PS: I love cars 🙂

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    1. Thank you so much for all the positive comments. Filmmaking sounds very interesting. Will you be going into directing and cinematography or something on thw writing side? In any case I’m very excited for you and look forward to any movies you make (please no car crashes! It absolutely breaks my heart 😦 ). Good luck with everything 🙂

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      1. I’m currently working on screenplays actually.. And I plan on pursuing directing too.. Thats prolly the core of the dream. Nonetheless.. A dream is an armour and I’m certain you’ll use that to make india proud.. The world will be silently rooting for you. ‘Go FOR IT’!!!!!!

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  7. The fact that made it hard for me to find a job caused me to try out my own business (in this case, it’s blogging my way towards journalism). I agree with you – grades, achievements, and a “good” resume do NOT define us. It’s just concrete proof of a PART of us. There has to be a way employers can see beyond the labels and actually KNOW the person before making the decision to not hire them.

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    1. Lucky you. Unfortunately I have neither the experience nor the capital to start my own firm (consultancy or otherwise). I agree, there has to be another way to choose candidates for a job. Exactly how to do that is a question I am unable to answer currently but we need to put more effort and resources into finding a solution.

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  8. Dear Manasa.

    From what you have written above, it appears to me that you have been trying to get a job by sending your resume directly to corporate HR departments, sending it to recruiters, or spending countless hours filling out those abominable electronic “apply here” forms at corporate HR websites, which can take up a big part of any day. If you have been doing this, it is no wonder you have not found a job. These corporate entities and processes are all designed to deflect you and get rid of you like a piece of trash—and do it as quickly and efficiently as possible. These approaches to job hunting are a well-known one way trip to the waste basket for your resume and any reasonable chance of finding a job. This is not how most hiring managers find employees, and it is especially NOT the way they find them in the depths of a Great Recession when millions of people are out of work.

    Here is what you need to do, and I guarantee it will change your perspective and your job hunting life forever. Go to your local bookstore and buy a copy of the famous job hunting manual recommended by the Harvard School of Business and every competent person who really knows how to go job hunting. The author’s name is Richard Nelson Bolles, and the title of his book is:

    “What Color Is your Parachute?”

    A new 2015 edition has just hit the bookstores in the United States. It is very different from most of the “truly garbage” job hunting books that fill most bookstore shelves and are just tired old rehashes of very old and hopelessly wrong ways to go about job hunting.

    And no. I am not associated with the book, its publisher, or Dick Bolles. I am just an ordinary person like you who lives on an ordinary street in the United States. Get the book, read it, apply it—and you will do much better and be much smarter in your job hunting—especially if you are job hunting in the United States.

    Good luck—and trust me on this. Your life and your perspective will be changed.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks a lot for the alternative. I have just begun my application processes but this was based on all my applications for internships. I will try finding the book on Amazon since it’s very hard to find books in English here in Germany. I hope I can learn something from it. Thanks again.

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  9. Good luck Manasa, girl in the mechanical field. I hear you, job searching is indeed hard. It helped me to see that sometimes the recruitment process is random – there are so many CVs per job that the employer is also at a loss as to which to choose, and precisely because of this he sometimes chooses randomly. So it’s half your effort and half luck – I take it less personally upon a rejection. Networking helps, as it puts a face to your resume. Difficult process nonetheless, I wish you all the luck. Never give up, because eventually that first job does land somewhere!

    Pixie

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    1. Thanks a lot! I haven’t given up as yet. I’m just getting started on the job search and hope to land something sooner rather than later. Networking is something I am actively pursuing and Linkedin is making it so much easier for me. I am putting in effort, let’s just hope my luck kicks in 🙂

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  10. I was going to say “heavens, girl, you write so well, you should have no problem with a cover letter!” just pick and choose what is in here that seems most relevant to the company you are targeting. Then in other comments you made it clear that you’re trying to write all this in German. Yikes! Is it possible to make anyone sound good in German even when they are a native speaker?. 😉 Good luck, and remember – there’s a lot of German engineering done in the United States these days. And it’s a language in which you express yourself very well.

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    1. Thank you Paula. Yes, USA is definitely an option but you can only apply to USA if you have a work permit and I don’t so the whole purpose is defeated. German is frankly a very interesting language. IT’s so specific so it’s perfect for a resume or cover letter if you are a native speaker. That if is giving me problems 🙂

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  11. The job search can be so discouraging…after so many rejections, it can be hard to even motivate yourself to apply for more. Don’t give up though- stay passionate and keep trying for the life you want!

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  12. Dear jobseeker pal!
    Great post! I really enjoyed reading it. What you wrote is exactly what I went thru and felt while looking for my first job after I graduated. And now that I quit my job 4 months ago, I am about to experience it all over again…
    Goodluck in your job search!

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  13. And it is the vicious cycle when it comes to jobs and job hunting. To get a job you need experience but to get experience you need a job. It’s like something you’d find in a Dilbert comic but it adds insult to injury because of the fact that it’s real life.

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    1. Experience is a whole other can of worms which I’m yet to open. I’ve done student jobs for 2 years and have almost a year of experience now with my internship and master thesis but they end up counting to nothing despite the fact that I’ve learnt so much. Right now I’m sticking to openings for freshers and mostly to Trainee positions so I get to learn more and also in different areas.

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      1. That sounds better than what I’m doing. I’ve filled out over 150 different applications for various jobs and had 20 different interviews. All with no results.

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        1. Yeah, I know what you mean. I have seen a lot of friends do that. The problem is that all applications end up in the HR and when they see you applying to different fields I guess they think you’re indifferent. Which is why I’m making it a point to apply to what I like. When I don’t find it then I’m making these initiative applications saying this is my area of interest so please consider me if you have anything in it.

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  14. Nice. And do I need to mention that you need to cut, cut, cut? Too many words. Too, too, many. But nice.

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  15. Manasa I would love to reblog this if you’ll allow me to. It’s a great read for recruiters, companies as well people applying for work in tough market conditions.

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  16. Love this. Change mechanical engineering to mass communication and change cars to writing – you’ve practically written the words in my brain. Love love love it. 🙂 good luck with the job 🙂

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  17. This even furthers my opinion to only do things you love. If you don’t love your job/career, change it.
    Your happiness is far more important than monetary value.

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    1. Yes of course! It’s very important to love what you do but not everyone has the luxury to pursue what they love. Especially in India. The scenario is definitely changing now but it’s still very hard to find something who will pursue a career in music or art because 1. it doesn’t pay and 2. your parents will think you’re crazy. I’ve found the best way is to find the next best thing and continue to do what you love so it’s a win on both ends.

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  18. As a recent graduate, I am on the same boat. It’s like life has become a rut for me. I get up in the morning and check my e-mail to see if I got an interview. Then I continue to apply for more jobs with the phone close to my hand in case I get a call back from one of the companies. Good luck, fellow hunter!

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    1. Patience and persistence is key. Life has a funny way of working out to test how bad someone really wants something. Do not give up and remember that it only takes one call to change your life for the better.

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    2. Good luck on the job hunt. I know it’s hard but you shouldn’t give up. Find jobs you actually want to do and apply to them. It’s far easier to make your application when you like what you’re applying to rather than applying to something just because you don’t have an alternative. I would also suggest sending initiative applications, if it’s possible, where you can specify what you’d like to do. It shows, as the name says, initiative and drive. There are a lot of jobs out there so don’t get discouraged.

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  19. I love this! When I get a job I interview myself before they even get my application. I love the hospitality industry and it’s so important for my new managers to know who I am before they read a piece of paper. I like to throw them for a loop. A friend once told me “that’s the most absolute worst way to get a job, don’t ever interview yourself.” Well the job I have right now is because I interview myself, the jobs I have always received is because I have interviewed myself. Enjoyed reading reading this! Good luck!!!

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  20. Unfortunately, the process of hiring has significantly changed. Company members used to review every job application they received but now it has become automated. Applicants now have to word each resume very carefully because there are programs that eliminate thousands of applicants based on the words they used to advertise themselves.

    The ideal candidate for the bigger companies are desperate applicants because they know that these people are more likely to have the mind of a “sponge” and do as they are told. To be honest, companies feel that you need them more than they need you because in their minds, there is always someone better who will work for less. This is why I appreciate the smaller companies because like a smaller classroom, there is more focus and development present.

    Most employers, if not all, care more about how you managed your time. You could have maintained perfect grades throughout college and graduate school but that does not make you an ideal candidate. You would be an ideal candidate for me than the 4.0 student if you have a 2.5 or 3.0 and were highly involved activities on and off campus. How do you handle defeat? What is your definition of success? What have you learned through your success and failures? What are your goals in life? These all important questions that help paint the picture of who a candidate is.

    It is unfortunate that anyone would try to take all of your sweat and tears away from you by asking you if it was by choice or by chance. At the end of the day, you know how hard you worked and no one can take that from you. The only thing you should consider a limitation is how you allow the ignorance of others to affect how you feel about yourself and your actions.

    Knowing that nothing in life is perfect, you should not be hard on yourself. There is always someone smarter anywhere you go. People have said that you are in the wrong room if you are the smartest person there, which is true. We are all spitting images of the people we are surround ourselves with. Surround yourself with intelligent people who share similar and different views so you are all able to rub off on each other and see the world through a wider perspective.

    Manasa, in my mind, there is no doubt that you are bound to do great things in life. The time that you took to write this post and its content says a lot about you, which is why I took the time to write my response. I do not see how sending what you wrote to a potential employer can possibly hurt you in any way because it will reveal everything they want and more.

    You are on a great path to success as long as you do not change yourself. One thing I ask of you when you become successful is to never change who you are because the day that money and power changes our morals and values, is the day we lose ourselves.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much thejlpz for taking out the time to write such a long and detailed reply. I really appreciate it. I hope more recruiters think like you and consider students who have less than perfect grades. I’ve found I’ve learnt a lot of things that aren’t taught at school and are as important, if not more, as the theory or concepts we study. I’m just taking things as they come and preparing one step at a time. Hopefully it all works out. When I do make any progress I definitely will post an update here. Thanks for all the support and encouragement.

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  21. Well written, I wish you luck. In New York they have a saying “Is not what you know, is who you know” and that my friend was so true and I can’t tell you how much that use to upset me. Who has time to kiss ass, in a world like New York where every one is out to cut throats and higher scores and longer resumes are in better place. Specially when the friends you have are all in the same boat. I often thought I needed to go into a bar or night clubs where these individual would socialize, just so I had that connection, I was felt shame that I had to think like a slut, just to get ahead of the game. And more importantly to make a decent living.

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  22. I feel your pain! This was beautifully written. I’ve been job searching forever. I just turned 26 and I feel like the biggest loser on the planet, not to mention that I couldn’t afford college. It’s tough out there!

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    1. Don’t give up yet. I’m sure there is something out there for you. Job searching can be quite discouraging, especially when you can’t find what you’re looking for. Be positive and I’m sure great things will come your way. Don’t let anyone call you a loser. Especially not yourself. If you can’t believe in yourself then no one can.

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